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Social Security Call Scam – How Does It Work?

The scammers have been known to pretend to be from Social Security Administration by calling you, claiming they will seize your social security benefits for back taxes or other reasons. The scammers try to convince you to pay the fine or face jail time. If you receive such a call, hang up immediately. Don’t fall for these scams!

Social Security call scams are very common, especially during the holiday season. A lot of people fall victim to them. In this blog post, we’ll look at the different types of Social Security scam calls and how they work.

We all know Social Security scams are out there. Many people think that they’re not real because the scammers have to ask for Social Security numbers. Unfortunately, it’s not true.

The Social Security Administration has warned about these scams for years. Unfortunately, they’re still happening, and many people fall victim to them.

Now and then, you’ll get a call at home from someone claiming to be calling on behalf of the Social Security Administration. These calls are sometimes called “Social Security Scams” or “SSA Scams.” The scammers call to collect information often used to file a fraudulent claim for Social Security benefits, usually claiming to be an official from the SSA. This is a scam, but that doesn’t mean it doesn’t happen.

Social Security

Social Security scams

Social Security scams are very common, especially during the holiday season. A lot of people fall victim to them. In this blog post, we’ll look at the different types of Social Security scam calls and how they work.

Call type 1: Social Security scams that do not ask for a number

Call type 2: Social Security scams that ask for a number

Call type 3: Social Security scams that ask for a number and then hang up

Call type 4: Social Security scams that ask for a number and then record the conversation

Call type 5: Social Security scams that ask for a number and then play the recording

Call type 6: Social Security scams that ask for a number and then call back

Call type 7: Social Security scams that ask for a number and then call back again

Call type 8: Social Security scams that ask for a number and then call back repeatedly

How to prevent social security scams

Social security scams can be very dangerous if you fall victim to them. These scams are often very convincing, so being aware of them is important.

In this blog post, we’ll look at how these scams work and what you can do to prevent them from happening.

What are the signs of a scam?

If you’ve ever gotten a phone call or email from someone claiming to be from the Social Security Administration, you know they’re not legitimate. These scammers use a variety of tactics to convince people to give them their Social Security numbers.

They might:

  • Send you a fake letter, or fake email
  • Use a computer voice
  • Claim to be a government official
  • Ask for a Social Security number

You’ll probably recognize most of these tactics used by other scams. But they’re still real, and they’re happening right now.

How can I tell if the caller is legit?

Do you feel uneasy when you hear the phone ring and the caller asks for your Social Security number? If so, you’re probably dealing with a scammer.

You should hang up immediately if you’re asked to give your Social Security number over the phone.

Your SSN is among the most valuable personal information a crook can have. It’s a huge red flag for identity theft. It’s a huge red flag for identity theft. Even if you don’t use it for anything nefarious, it’s a target for criminals because it’s so widely available. A record of your SSN is on your credit report, and that’s one of the things a potential employer looks at when they do background checks. If you’re applying for a job or a loan, having a bad credit score might prevent you from getting approved.

Don’t worry; you’re not being robbed or committing fraud. The caller is looking for your Social Security number to verify your identity.

Frequently asked questions about Social Security Call Scam

Q: How can I protect myself from Social Security scam callers?

A: If someone calls you saying they are from the Social Security Administration, hang up immediately. The number is (800) 772-1213, only for Social Security matters. Scammers, as well as legitimate companies, use the number.

Q: How can I file a complaint about a Social Security scammer?

A: To report a scam or fraud complaint to the Office of the Inspector General: www.socialsecurity.gov/oig/. This office will take action against the person responsible for scams and fraud. You can also file a complaint with the Federal Trade Commission at www.ftc.gov.

Q: What should I do if I receive a call from a Social Security scammer?

A: If someone calls you saying they are from Social Security, hang up immediately. It is a scam.

Top myths about Social Security Call Scam

  1. The call may come from your Social Security Administration.
  2. You must pay the $5 fee.
  3. You must give them a credit card number.

Conclusion    

The Social Security Call scam is a fraud operating for many years. They prey on seniors who may not be financially savvy and have already heard about the fraud.

They call and say they’re with the Social Security Administration and are trying to verify your information. When you answer, they pretend to need your social security sand personal identification numbers. They then ask for the first three digits of your social security number and your birthday.

If you are a victim of this scam, I would advise you against hanging up and contacting the police immediately.

If they persist, contact your local fraud department as well. If you are reading this, a Nigerian prince has scammed you. The scammer is probably not Nigerian, but he has used the name of Nigeria to trick people into believing he is a Nigerian prince. The scammer claims to be a Nigerian prince who needs help to pay his debt and is willing to pay huge amounts of money to make it happen. This is the most common form of this scam. Some scam artists use a different method.

About author

Social media trailblazer. Analyst. Web evangelist. Thinker. Twitter advocate. Internetaholic.Once had a dream of deploying jungle gyms in Gainesville, FL. Spent several years getting to know psoriasis in Prescott, AZ. Was quite successful at analyzing human growth hormone in Ohio. Spent 2001-2008 donating cod worldwide. Developed several new methods for supervising the production of country music in Edison, NJ. Practiced in the art of developing strategies for UFOs in Naples, FL.
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